Akhmal Travels: Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan

Oh dear, I've never had this kind of jet lag before. I've been in bed all day feeling extremely fatigued. 

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The day after reaching Tokyo, we moved south to Tokushima. That being said, it took us an hour domestic flight.

Imagine the amount of jet lags I've been having. A total of 6 flights in a week time. 

Tokushima gave a different perspective of Japan. Unlike Tokyo, it's far more calm and... old? In a sense that most of the citizens are elderly and it's rich in Japanese tradition and culture.

Our hotel was by the river full with yachts - it has that Amsterdam feel, you see.


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As I said before, the culture and tradition is quite dominant. I admit, me myself am not a big fan of history but boy now did I see how remarkable these historic places are (Nope, that does not mean I'm ever enthusiastic in studying history).

Some things I witnessed were the making of garments traditional way - they call it 'Indigo dyeing' (a local asset that constitutes 80% of their economy) and the local dance - awa odori (took me days just to remember that. lol!)



It's beautiful.

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You what to know what else is far MORE beautiful?

Food.

And it was in Tokushima I had my first LEGIT Japan sushi, for $1 per dish.




hehehehehehehehehe.

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Here's the Tokushima Palace Museum




That was a legit palace in the Samurai Era (Edo Era). The park, as I was told, is a popular spot for a pre-wedding photoshoot. In fact, I came across one while strolling around the park, full in their kimonos/yukatas. I mean, come on. The sight is enough to fall in love.

How about that for a dating place? 

Oh, you want a piece of advice?

Be sure to go in late March/early April. There'll be cherry blossoms everywhere. It's Spring.

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and here's one the of many temples and shrines in Japan.

Fujii Temple, Shikoku 11th Temple



Buddhism's goddess of lost babies/children above.





It's hard to put in words on how fascinated I was. The trip really opened my eyes somehow to preserving our OWN culture and tradition.

Coincidentally, I decided to wear something of MY own culture, to remember where I'm from and I couldn't be anymore prouder of who I am.


Talking about a clash of cultures.


Let's close this off before I go deeper than I already am.

Truly,
Appreciate who you are. 


Thanks to Wafiqah Kamaruddin (first photo) & Ady Hazriyatul (last two photos) for helping me out with the photography

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